Gibraltar to Romero: Ride Where You Want

All-City and Dabbing at the head of the Romero Trail
Me and my All-City Super Professional Dabbing at the head of the Romero Trail above Santa Barbara, CA

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When it comes to the topic of which type of cycling is best, most of us can readily agree that as long as we’re outside and having fun, it shouldn’t matter. Where this agreement ends, however, is with the outliers—the people who defy the norm and do things with their bikes that most people wouldn’t do. Like a rogue cop who just can’t leave a case alone, I feel the need to drive everyone else away with my weird cycling ways. “You’re on the edge, man! You’re gonna burn yourself out and end up hurting those who love you the most!” …Is what my captain would say before he asks for my gun and badge. 

Alas, I am not a cop. I don’t have a captain to listen to, and my life is not an action movie. Will I continue to alienate other riders with my flippant refusal to wear lycra (not a good look on me) and ride road bikes on any surface? Yes. Yes, I will.

I like to ride my bike where most people would ride a more appropriate bike. For example, the route I chose in the Santa Barbara front country is a typical one that many on a mountain bike would ride. Up Romero Canyon Trail and down Gibraltar Road. However, I wanted to see what that route would be like in reverse on a drop-bar bike. It did not disappoint. It was also not painless.

The route:

There is a very long ascent up Gibraltar Road to East Camino Cielo which includes some pretty tough sections for climbing. The bike I punished myself with on this ride is my All-City Super Professional. It is a steel, all-road bike with a single 38-tooth chainring that drives an 11-40-tooth cassette. It climbed slowly. 

There are a few Cat 4 sections before the Gibraltar Road meets East Camino Cielo. ECC, as the cool kids call it, slowly ascends and rolls up and down. It is an enjoyable ride with vistas on both sides. It goes like that for a few miles until it reaches a dirt parking area. On one side is an OHV (off-highway vehicle) trail. On the other is the top of Old Romero Canyon “Road.” There is a cistern in front of which one can prepare for the bike and body punishment to ensue. Also, I deflated my tires a little. I have 700 x 42 Teravail Cannonball tires (tubeless) inflated to 50 psi for the road, 25 psi for the dirt.

The trail starts off with some flowy sections and hard-packed dirt with the occasional rock cobble just chilling in the middle of the path. Eventually, the course becomes more unpredictable with slippery areas of sandstone, loose rocks, and occasional loose dirt. It is only towards the split towards the singletrack that the ride becomes too much to stay in the saddle full time. There are areas where getting off the bike and walking are safer. Sometimes, giant boulders are blocking the path.

The limits of the All-City Super Professional
There were few places where I had to get off the bike on the Romero Trail.

The best plan for a bike like mine is to avoid the singletrack and head towards the fire road. Once there, it is just a matter of avoiding the rocks and ruts. My bike handles speed in this terrain well. My body, however, does not. I begin to see why I had to turn in my badge and gun. I guess I might be getting too old for this.

Since I was on a road bike, I forded the creek on foot—the bridge was washed out in 2018 by the 1/9 Debris Flow—I then dodged some families on my way towards the trailhead.

The bonus descent down Romero Canyon Road towards the 192 was next after I re-inflated my tires. I carry a Lezyne Floor Drive for this. It comes in handy from time to time. After a bone-shaking experience, a quick road descent is always a great reward. 

To sum up, no matter what, bikes can be ridden anywhere. Is it a good idea? Not really. But that is my jam. It is how I roll. The lesson is, you don’t have to wear lycra and put down watts to be a cyclist. It is simply a matter of being on two wheels, enjoying the fresh air.