Feeling Super Professional

[Image gallery at the end of the article.]

I was at Frostbike earlier this year in Denver, CO. We were walking towards the expo floor to meet our QBP rep when I spied the All-City Cycles booth from outside the door. Up on one of the stands was the glittery offering from the venerable steel-is-real company: the 2020 Super Professional. When viewed from afar, it looked like a typical steel road bike. Close up, like a Monet, it was an entirely different viewing experience (only instead of being a big ol’ mess, it came together beautifully).

All-City describes, in a few words, what the Super Professional is: an “urban cross machine,” and a “super commuter.” Yes. That’s affirmative. It’s essentially what you would get if you invited a gravel racer, a steel-road-bike nerd, an alley-cat-crit-fixie-spoke-card artist, a cross-country-touring lady, and a dude who commutes to work everyday to a product development meeting.

This bike is as close as a company can get to a does-everything-you-want-short-of-singletrack implement without adding suspension. All-City went a step further and came up with a master dropout system that allows the rider to switch from a single-speed to a multi-geared bike and still have a thru axle.

Getting back to Frostbike for a second: I saw the SP (that’s how the cool kids refer to it) on the elevated stand at the expo. I’m usually not one for flowery language, but I was so moved by its appearance that I…

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…stood fast and stared agape at the hummingbird-like iridescent glow emanating from the myriad flakes in that paint that I was awash in a color gamut that set my hair on end and imbued my psyche with such ardor that the entire concourse gathered thence felt my catharsis.
</flowerylanguage>

Our QBP rep snapped me out of my bliss by making a comment that the bike would look totally sick with some Whisky bars and Paul Klampers.

Indeed.

My mission was clear. I would acquire the frame and strip my beloved Kona Sutra of most of its parts to feed my desire to someday ride this bike.

As a touring cyclist, gravel enthusiast, and Cat 6 commuter, I did just that. I built up this amazing bike with the drivetrain and brakes from my Sutra. I acquired some OEM wheels from a friend’s Santa Cruz Stigmata (those DT 350s, don’t even get me started), and I was deep into the build.

The only thing that gave me pause was the flat-mount road disc lugs. I really wanted to use my I-S Paul Klampers so badly that I had to special order some Shimano adapters to be able to use them. That was the only hangup in the build.

After it was complete, I took a ride to the state-mandated-lockdown wasteland that is the Santa Barbara Funk Zone. Comprised of old industry building that house breweries, wineries, and restaurants, it was completely empty. Not a soul for blocks. There were so many walls I could use to to get a shot of the bike that I began to think I have a thing for walls. You get the idea. I took a bunch of pictures (below, after the build list).

Build List

  • Frame: 2020 All-City Super Professional with Goldust colorway and multi-speed master dropout.
  • Drivetrain: Shimano Ultegra R8000 shifters to XTR M9000 SGS 11-speed derailleur via Wolftooth Tanpan and Goatlink; XT M8000 crankset with Wolftooth Dropstop 38t chainring; 11-42t XT M8000 cassette.
  • Paul Klamper mechanical disc brakes with Shimano flat-mount adapters (F160 P/D, and R160 P/D).
  • Simworks Beatnik seat post.
  • Simworks Rhonda stem and titanium headset spacers.
  • Whiskey No. 7 Drop handlebars.
  • DT Swiss 350 hubs laced to XR361 rims, 700c.
  • Teravail Cannonball 700 x 42 gumwall tires.
  • Swift Industries Zeitgeist saddle bag.
  • Brooks Swift saddle…meow meow LOOK AT THE PICTURES!!!

1994 Bridgestone MB-1: A Dank Daily Rider

1994 Bridgestone MB-1 drive side view

1994 Bridgestone MB-1 drive side view

More pictures and parts list at the end of the article!

It has been said that “steel is real.” Indeed, one can walk up to a steel bike, touch it, and feel the real steel. Many companies in the 1980s and 1990s made some pretty impressive steel frames. Those that were made in the US or Japan at that time are considered the best by some and works of art by others. There may even be one located in a garage or barn nearby just waiting to be resurrected and ridden.

For a daily rider, a bike should have a comfortable geometry and be made from a metal that is responsive, with just the right amount of stiffness. For me, nothing is better than a well-crafted, lugtastic steel bicycle frame with excellent design provenance and amazing tubing. The 1994 Bridgestone MB-1 certainly fits the bill.

Not all of the Bridgestone models from this time period were made like the MB-1 (or MB-2s and some of the 3s, for that matter). That doesn’t mean that they aren’t good bikes. Many of the lower-end models of the MB-, RB-, and XO- lines are still awesome bikes. Any frame-up build of one of those would result in a great daily rider. However the MB-1 (and for some reason, the MB-Zip) holds a special place in the hearts of riders and collectors.

1994 Bridgestone MB-1 Brooks head badge detail

1994 Bridgestone MB-1 Brooks head badge detail with lugtastic lugs!

The US division of Bridgestone Bicycle Company was run by Grant Petersen. As Sheldon Brown (rest in peace) recounts:

Bridgestone is an enormous multinational company, one of the largest tire companies in the world…and a fairly small bicycle company, with its own factory in Japan. In the late 1980s and early ’90s, its U.S. bicycle division was run by Grant Petersen, a brilliant, talented and idiosyncratic designer.

Petersen, a hard-core cyclist, marched to a “different drummer” than most of the industry. He introduced many innovations to the market, and also strongly resisted other trends and innovations that he didn’t approve of.

As a result, the Japanese-made frames of this time were beautifully constructed (lower-end models were made in Taiwan and did not use lugs and were TIG welded). Made from the highest end of Tange Prestige tubing, these frames are not only desirable, but ride extremely well. Many of the features on the -1s and -2s are evident in the construction of Petersen’s current venture, Rivendell Cycle Works. His Bridgestone legacy also continues in other bikes as well: Handsome Cycles uses the same lugged construction and geometry of the Bridgestone RB-T in their Devil model.

How one acquires such a frame through trade or favor is another story (especially the favor part). This particular build uses some of my favorite components from various bikes that I have ridden and build up a really nice-but-not-too-nice bike for my daily rider-slash-errand-slash-bar bike.

The wheels are my own creation, using an old but smooth Shimano Parallax 100 (LX) hub for the front and a Shimano XT 9-speed hub in the rear. I laced them using DT-Swiss Champion 2.0 spokes on 26-inch Sun Ringle Rhyno Lite rims. Though not entirely period correct, they look great and are super stiff. Wrapping them with classic-look Kenda K-Rad gumwalls, (yes – they exist!) completes the road contact with style.

1994 Bridgestone MB-1 shifter detail

1994 Bridgestone MB-1 shifter detail

The drivetrain is a Shimano XT 3×9 with a Deore triple that came stock on my 2017 Kona Sutra. I realize that a lot of folks are leaving triple chain rings to history these days, but I am using Shimano Dura Ace bar-end shifters mounted on Paul Components Thumbies to give me that slightly-updated classic feel to my shifting. It works great and a friction-front shifter is not only nostalgic for me, it allows for more accurate trim adjustment.

For the connection points, I chose SimWorks Fun 3 bar with Paul Components Canti Levers (connected to their Neo-Retro cantilever brakes), held by the SimWorks Gettin’ Hungry quill stem. I managed to salvage an older Shimano XT headset to use as well. The saddle is a Brooks B-17 that is older than the frame itself, connected to a classic Race Face XY seat post. Pedals are the awesome VP-001 in a fitting, and no longer available Rivendell gray.

Now that I am done patting myself on the back for building one of the dankest rides ever, I just want to say that I am humbled by the history of these older bike frames. It has been a while since we have seen a company put a lot of money and materials into such care and precision on a mass-market scale. Remember though, there are many frame builders out there who are running amazing businesses and creating phenomenal bikes. They have learned from these old frames and their designers and are building on their legacy. I would love it if I could ride them all. Alas, with my curious lack of thousands of dollars for a new frame, riding a classic will do just fine.

Parts List (prices are at the time of this writing):

Shimano XT-M772 rear derailleur – $64.99 (from various dealers)
Shimano XT-M781 front derailluer – approx. $25.00 (if in stock anywhere)
Shimano SL-BS77 9-speed bar-end shifters – $90.00 (from various dealers)
Paul Components Thumbies – $95.00
Paul Components Canti Levers – $146.00
Paul Components Neo-retro cantilever brakes (x2) – $121.00
SimWorks Fun 3 bar – $55.00
SimWorks Gettin’ Hungry Stem – $88.00
Brooks B-17 Standard Saddle – $145.00
Raceface XY seat post – between $12.00-$77.00 (!) on eBay
VP Pedals 001 – $65.00 (from various dealers)
Shimano Parallax 100 front hub – approx. $30.00 on eBay
Shimano XT FH-RM70 rear hub – Approx $20.00 on eBay
Rhyno Lite 32-hole, 26-inch rims (x2) – $45.00 f(rom various dealers)
Kenda K-Rad tires – $34.99 (from various dealers)