Quick Review: 2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle

2017 SE Racing Stu Thompson Edition 29" Quadangle

2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle – Wait! Where’s my Landing Gears???

Picture Gallery at the end of the article!

BMX racing back in the 1970s and 80s was something special. It was a new sport. For children and adolescents, it gave them the ability to race bicycles in serious, organized competition. Not only that, they had their own heroes to look up to that weren’t European. Racers such as Perry Kramer and Stu Thomsen, to name only two, were right up there as the bicycle versions of motocross champions. It is no wonder that SE Racing, which has been making BMX racing bikes since the 1970s (they are celebrating their 40th year this year), has seized upon the champions of that time to reintroduce us to the storied bicycles of our past.

That’s why I was so excited when I heard that SE Racing was planning to release the Stu Thomsen Edition Quadangle, the STR-29. Their previous version of the 26-inch Quadangle was so well received by the BMX nostalgia set, that I was waiting to see what they would come up with next. A new colorway? Maybe some shiny pads? I was hoping that there would be something else other than the Public Enemy Big Ripper to make their bikes more exciting.

Before I get to the review, let’s talk about beach cruisers for a second. The SE Racing Retro series are not meant to be raced anymore. They are pure nostalgia pieces that make excellent cruisers. Beach cruisers, at least the modern interpretation, are not even bicycles. They are a decision made by some corporate monkeys who want to keep their companies relevant somehow. So I can see the reason for the SE Racing Retro series existence. They hearken back to the days when one wasn’t racing, they were cruising. They also look way cooler and are of a higher quality (relatively speaking) than their flowery, wicker-basketed counterparts. Bikes like the Quadangle are not here to replace what beach cruisers have become. They are here to give people an opportunity to look good on a bike whilst cruising. SE Racing has done a great job of tapping into nostalgia and creating that necessary out for those who just want to pedal down to the beach and not look like an asshole.

See these girls? No way I'm getting any by riding this bike.

See these girls? Ten-speed dude in the back has a better chance with them.

Enough said about my opinion about beach cruisers. So now lets get to the review.

From across the room. Just like the 26-inch Quadangle…’cept different. How different? Well let me just say that this bike would look normal sized next to The Mountain, or the Statue of Liberty. It’s 29-inch wheels are big, to be sure. But in my opinion, they look a little too big compared to the compact-looking Quadangle geometry. But hey, we’re all compensating for something, amirite? Hey, check out the quote on the bike’s product page and get schooled in some old-school retroness:

Before the Quadangle, there was the STR-1. This dates back to the late 1970’s when Stu Thomsen was SE Racing’s National #1 pro and the sport’s first superstar. His signature frame at the time was the Stu Thomsen Replica-1. This STR-1 frame had a unique design with both of the double down tubes wrapping underneath the bottom bracket shell and continuing around the Looptail rear end all the way back to the seat tube. Less than ten STR-1’s were ever produced, and over the years these frames became almost mythical and the most sought after frames of all time in the vintage BMX world. Fast forward nearly 40 years to today and SE is proud to bring you, the limited edition STR-29. All of the unique features and radness of the original STR-1, but built for the bigger rider with 29″ wheels. This bike comes with an authentic SE Racing x Stu Thomsen trading card personally signed by Stu. Making history, once again.

The bigger rider? Well, I guess that some of us who remember Stu’s glory days are a little on the heavy side now. Just remember that this is a tribute bike, not an exact replica. It does not look anything like the original. So they had to make some adjustments so this bike would look normal when ridden by grown-ass men. In any case, I asked Stu what he thought at Interbike back in September and he seemed cool with it. So there you go. Validation.

Stu and his normal-sized Quadangle back in 1980.

Stu and his normal-sized Quadangle back in 1980.

The build. After all this historical context, I just can’t…I can’t be nice about this. There really is no other way to put it: The build quality is lacking in…well, quality. Particularly, the welding. I want to focus on this as there are so many of us in the bike world that look at welding as the one facet that speaks to a bike’s build quality. For the STR Quadangle, it looks like whoever (or whatever machine) initially tacked the frame together forgot to finish the job. One would think, after reading the above quote, that the bottom bracket shell would have had some semblance of quality control attention paid to it. But it looks like it is ready to just snap off. The other Quadangles that SE has put out didn’t have this problem. The BB shells were welded to the frame in a more acceptable fashion. Having never seen an original STR-1 up close, I can’t say for certain that the welding is period correct or not. I’m only looking at this bike from a modern quality and safety viewpoint.

The usual SE Racing components are there: the fluted seat post, the blocky stem and the saddle that they seem to phone in on every model. The tires, freewheel and pedals are what you’d expect from a bike of this price point. You even get a limited edition sticker pack and BMX trading card signed by Stu himself.

A welcome sight is to see the lack of a Landing Gear sticker on the forks. “BMX Innovations” is period correct and sounds way better. However, I can just see Landing Gear fans buying Landing Gear stickers to put on their BMX Innovation forks that are really just Landing Gear forks anyways. The Redline Flight Tubular 175 mm crankset is pretty awesome. Although I think the 9mm x 6-tooth heat-treated chromoly spindle and crank arms may be a lot stronger than the frame itself. Just keep in mind that after the frame and bottom bracket shell welds fail, you will be left with a very usable $119.00 crankset which you can put on another bike.

The ride. Not bad at all. When I say not bad, I mean for a single speed cruiser, it rides really not bad. The larger wheels make the ride smooth. The compact geometry of the Quadangle frame make it comfy. The stock Tange headset should be replaced by a Chris King No Threadset  or even a Neco to make the steering a little more confident. That’s about it.

Final note. The SE Racing Stu Thomsen Limited Edition 29-inch Quadangle is a cool bike. It’s a great bike for cruising and it’s looks are unique. Even if you are not a fan of the golden age of BMX racing, you would have a better chance of not looking like a tourist when riding along the beach on this thing. Buy it for the looks and ride. Don’t buy it if you are looking for a quality bike build.

Hey look! Pictures!

Quick Review: The 2015 Kona Humuhumu

Yours truly on the Red 20-inch Kona Humuhumu

Sexy chicken leg. Yours truly on the Red 20-inch Kona Humuhumu.

Its not often that a bike company will bring an older model back to its original glory simply because you wished it so. I don’t normally subscribe to faith or the belief that positive thoughts always have a physical manifestation…but in this case, maybe I should actually read that copy of The Secret my mom gave five years ago. I wonder what else I can come up with? Anyway, read below and check out the gallery.

Up for review today is the 2015 Kona Humuhumu. A bike that was once thought lost and given up on. A bike that started out awesome and had a good run with a longer moniker, the Humuhumunukunukuapu’a. It was awesome…chromoly all over the place! That is, until the brain trust over at Kona R and D decided to replace it with the Humu…a bastard aluminum homunculus of the original that looked like it belonged in the back alley of a favella grog n’ puke. But I digress. As mentioned above, I was wishing in the back of my mind that Kona would get their shit together. They did. Well…almost. Lemme ‘splain:

The 2015 Kona Humuhumu, a partial revision of the original klunker-inspired piece of awesomeness that was the original (don’t make me type out the name again), has almost already sold out of its first production run. Chromoly butted frame and converted to a 29’er (with a 700c x 19 WTB disc wheelset), the new incarnation is not quite the phoenix I wished it to be, but it is a damn nice piece of metal and rubber. Seeing that the trend for cruisers seems to be foregoing the traditional in favor of the accommodating-giant-dude variety, it’s no surprise that Kona converted this machine to a 29er. The tire variety alone is enough to please any of the hardcore customizers. I’m sure I will be seeing this thing with 700 x 23 tires on it rolling down the street soon. The disc brakes and modern rear dropout configuration add a nice feeling of adaptability and stability. And who can resist the new klunker crossbar handlebars? Well played, Kona. Well played. But I have some questions for you:

<rant>Why would you stop so short, K-dog? I thought we had something, you and I. I thought we had a telepathic connection. I thought that if the bike ever did unfuck itself, it would be perfect. I wanted you and I to go all the way! But alas, that is not reality. Gone is the original Cook Brothers Racing-inspired curved top tube of the past. And don’t even get me started on the saddle: it looks like you all just threw in a bunch of reject Dew saddles that you had laying around, it almost as laughable as the Wellgo Christmas-stocking gift pedals you graced this bike with. And the buffalo logo on the seat tube? Did someone let a hipster slip into the graphics department in the middle of the night? Am I supposed to imagine riding this thing around the campsite whilst drinking craft-brewed IPA from a mason jar in the latest Wes Anderson film?</rant>

That’s all I got against this thing, really. Even with the few things that I dislike about it, I want it. Badly. Not because of the nostalgia factor, but because it looks awesome, it rides very well and I look awesome riding it. WOB recommendation: Buy it. Customize the shit out of it and kill some street. Full specs here. Gallery below. Check it out.

2014 Annual Fiesta Cruiser Run

2014 Santa Barbara Fiesta Cruiser Run

Bicycles are family here in SB. A common thread.

The first Sunday of August is usually sort of a relief to locals. It marks the last day of Old Spanish Days Fiesta. A 90-year-old celebration of Spanish and Mexican tradition and culture here in Santa Barbara. It’s a great draw for tourists to spend their money and college kids to get drunk. Most of the locals tend to steer clear, only taking advantage of the food stalls and the barbecue opportunities. May of us Santa Barbarians like to call it Old Spanish Days Fiasco. Despite pretty notable things like featuring the largest equestrian parade in the United States, most locals are left wondering what the hell it is all for. Sure, we get to learn who Saint Barbara actually was and watch white people dress up like Mexicans for a day. It’s a big five-day city-wide party. But we are still left with millions of pieces of confetti lining the gutters and the subtle effluvia of horse shit.

It’s no wonder that many of the locals have created their own event to look forward to. The annual Fiesta Cruiser Run, now in its 32nd year, is an unsanctioned (illegal) ride that started out with a few cruiser/klunker riders riding north from Santa Barbara to Goleta on the beach. It soon evolved into a massive cluster of thousdands of riders taking over the streets, hitting liquor stores and beach parks along the way. Indeed, it has become so popular, that the police have shut down many of the rest-stop festivities. But that doesn’t stop the majority of Santa Barbara true bloods planning all year long and building bikes especially for the ride. The preferred conveyance is the straight-bar cruiser decked out in BMX/klunker livery. Chris King headsets and SE Racing Landing Gear forks are ever present. But the best ones are the restored original Mongooses, Gary Littlejohns and Cook Brothers bikes. It is a veritable history lesson in single-speed legacies.

Colorful Frames of Mind

Awesome track frames at Cranky's bikes in Santa Barbara, CA.

Awesome track frames at Cranky’s bikes in Santa Barbara, CA

Even though I work in a bike shop, I still love other bike shops. Cranky’s Bikes is no exception. Jim always has some beautiful frames hanging over the counter. His shop is a very colorful place. All the folks that work there are awesome.

I have pretty much given up on fixies. My knees are getting a little too old to handle them. I still love  riding track bikes, tho. In fact, I wish Santa Barbara had a velodrome as I would be all over it ‘ERRYDAY. Cranky’s mainstays are track bikes, cyclocross, road, touring, cruisers and BMX. I hope if you ever get a chance to stop by, click through here and check out the directions to the shop.

Dylan

Dylan and his Surly Karate Monkey bicycle

Rides a 2013 Surly Karate Monkey.
Shot in an alley off Ortega Street in Santa Barbara, CA.
Going to work.

I first met Dylan about two years ago. He’s from the midwest. Iowa (I never see him eating corn, tho. Weird). He never wears socks. However, he’s the coolest guy with a beard you’ll ever meet. He is one of our bicycle mechanics at Velo Pro. He first got his 2013 Surly Karate Monkey about 6 months ago. About the same time I go my We the People 26″ BMX bike. When I saw that he shod his rims with Schwalbe Fat Franks, I immediately wish I had gotten a 29er for a single speed cruiser/mountain bike.

In any case, it’s because of hime that I cannot just own my Surly Crosscheck. I have to have a Karate Monkey as well. These bikes are just too cool. With all the cruiser culture we have here in Santa Barbara, I think a single-speed 29er is still the way to go. After all, I can’t afford a vintage Cook Brothers and restored Schwinns just do do it for me any more. I can only take so many Chris King headsets and SE Racing Landing Gear forks before I feel like it becomes a uniform for the Cruiser Army. I want to join Dylan’s Army.

Frank

Frank

Rides a 1957 Schwinn Hornet custom cruiser.
Shot on Ortega Street in Santa Barbara, CA.

Santa Barbara has a pretty strong cruiser culture. It may be attributed to the fact that we live by the beach, or that the city is small enough not to require a car. In any case, there is a group of guys who dedicate quite a bit of time and money towards customizing their cruisers. The creations are mostly reminiscent of the Cook Brothers Racing bikes from the 70s and 80s. A lot of these guys are of an age (myself included) that they remember all the cool BMX racing bikes and clunkers when they were kids. A good straight-bar cruiser is prized for its classic look as well as its ability to receive many new parts on the market today. Things like Chris King headsets, SE Landing Gear forks are all the rage. However, that is usually where the commonality stops.

Frank here is one of the only guys who has actually shoehorned in 29-inch wheels on his 26-inch cruiser. He has to grind the underside of the front fork in order to get it to work. The result is pretty cool. Way better than a Torker T-29. This is American steel and consumer innovation here. He’s also laced up a Sturmey Archer 2-speed kickback hub to give that uniqueness where a standard Bendix coaster brake wouldn’t do.

Mike

Mike

Rides a SB Cruisers custom hand-built BMX cruiser
Shot on State and Ortega in Santa Barbara, CA
Buying a bike computer and going for a ride.

Mike came in a while back with his hand-built BMX Cruiser. I thought the paint job on this thing was really awesome. He had a half-link chain and was going to install a cycling computer on it to complete the project. Reminiscent of Cook Brothers Racing, these cruisers are built here in Santa Barbara by appointment only…meaning, essentially, you need to know the right people. In any case, you can see a few of these bikes around town and they will all blow your mind.

Pete

Pete

Working on a vintage custom BMX cruiser
Shot at Cranky’s Bikes on State Street in Santa Barbara, CA

Yes, I work at a competing bike shop (Velo Pro). But also yes, I love bicycles. Cranky’s is one of those bike shops that I have a hard time staying away from. They tend to carry a lot of stuff that attracts me as a mostly asphalt rider. So I guess I am part of their target market. I love going in there from time to time to talk bikes and stare at all the gorgeous track frames hanging over the counter. I must confess, that in the spirit of supporting local business and our biking friends, I even buy some things from them from time to time. Pete and Josh are really cool guys. The owner, Jim C is really not cranky, either.

Bicycle Infrastructure Vol. 1

Bike Rack 1

An interesting bike rack in Ventura, CA. Made from old Cruisers and BMX bikes.

While I was walking in Downtown Ventura, CA, I cam across this really interesting bike rack. I’m pretty sure that it is both an art installation and functioning bike rack. However, it looks pretty weird with another bike actually locked to it. Note the S&M Bicycle stickers on the head tubes of the cruisers.