Quick Review: 2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle

2017 SE Racing Stu Thompson Edition 29" Quadangle

2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle – Wait! Where’s my Landing Gears???

Picture Gallery at the end of the article!

BMX racing back in the 1970s and 80s was something special. It was a new sport. For children and adolescents, it gave them the ability to race bicycles in serious, organized competition. Not only that, they had their own heroes to look up to that weren’t European. Racers such as Perry Kramer and Stu Thomsen, to name only two, were right up there as the bicycle versions of motocross champions. It is no wonder that SE Racing, which has been making BMX racing bikes since the 1970s (they are celebrating their 40th year this year), has seized upon the champions of that time to reintroduce us to the storied bicycles of our past.

That’s why I was so excited when I heard that SE Racing was planning to release the Stu Thomsen Edition Quadangle, the STR-29. Their previous version of the 26-inch Quadangle was so well received by the BMX nostalgia set, that I was waiting to see what they would come up with next. A new colorway? Maybe some shiny pads? I was hoping that there would be something else other than the Public Enemy Big Ripper to make their bikes more exciting.

Before I get to the review, let’s talk about beach cruisers for a second. The SE Racing Retro series are not meant to be raced anymore. They are pure nostalgia pieces that make excellent cruisers. Beach cruisers, at least the modern interpretation, are not even bicycles. They are a decision made by some corporate monkeys who want to keep their companies relevant somehow. So I can see the reason for the SE Racing Retro series existence. They hearken back to the days when one wasn’t racing, they were cruising. They also look way cooler and are of a higher quality (relatively speaking) than their flowery, wicker-basketed counterparts. Bikes like the Quadangle are not here to replace what beach cruisers have become. They are here to give people an opportunity to look good on a bike whilst cruising. SE Racing has done a great job of tapping into nostalgia and creating that necessary out for those who just want to pedal down to the beach and not look like an asshole.

See these girls? No way I'm getting any by riding this bike.

See these girls? Ten-speed dude in the back has a better chance with them.

Enough said about my opinion about beach cruisers. So now lets get to the review.

From across the room. Just like the 26-inch Quadangle…’cept different. How different? Well let me just say that this bike would look normal sized next to The Mountain, or the Statue of Liberty. It’s 29-inch wheels are big, to be sure. But in my opinion, they look a little too big compared to the compact-looking Quadangle geometry. But hey, we’re all compensating for something, amirite? Hey, check out the quote on the bike’s product page and get schooled in some old-school retroness:

Before the Quadangle, there was the STR-1. This dates back to the late 1970’s when Stu Thomsen was SE Racing’s National #1 pro and the sport’s first superstar. His signature frame at the time was the Stu Thomsen Replica-1. This STR-1 frame had a unique design with both of the double down tubes wrapping underneath the bottom bracket shell and continuing around the Looptail rear end all the way back to the seat tube. Less than ten STR-1’s were ever produced, and over the years these frames became almost mythical and the most sought after frames of all time in the vintage BMX world. Fast forward nearly 40 years to today and SE is proud to bring you, the limited edition STR-29. All of the unique features and radness of the original STR-1, but built for the bigger rider with 29″ wheels. This bike comes with an authentic SE Racing x Stu Thomsen trading card personally signed by Stu. Making history, once again.

The bigger rider? Well, I guess that some of us who remember Stu’s glory days are a little on the heavy side now. Just remember that this is a tribute bike, not an exact replica. It does not look anything like the original. So they had to make some adjustments so this bike would look normal when ridden by grown-ass men. In any case, I asked Stu what he thought at Interbike back in September and he seemed cool with it. So there you go. Validation.

Stu and his normal-sized Quadangle back in 1980.

Stu and his normal-sized Quadangle back in 1980.

The build. After all this historical context, I just can’t…I can’t be nice about this. There really is no other way to put it: The build quality is lacking in…well, quality. Particularly, the welding. I want to focus on this as there are so many of us in the bike world that look at welding as the one facet that speaks to a bike’s build quality. For the STR Quadangle, it looks like whoever (or whatever machine) initially tacked the frame together forgot to finish the job. One would think, after reading the above quote, that the bottom bracket shell would have had some semblance of quality control attention paid to it. But it looks like it is ready to just snap off. The other Quadangles that SE has put out didn’t have this problem. The BB shells were welded to the frame in a more acceptable fashion. Having never seen an original STR-1 up close, I can’t say for certain that the welding is period correct or not. I’m only looking at this bike from a modern quality and safety viewpoint.

The usual SE Racing components are there: the fluted seat post, the blocky stem and the saddle that they seem to phone in on every model. The tires, freewheel and pedals are what you’d expect from a bike of this price point. You even get a limited edition sticker pack and BMX trading card signed by Stu himself.

A welcome sight is to see the lack of a Landing Gear sticker on the forks. “BMX Innovations” is period correct and sounds way better. However, I can just see Landing Gear fans buying Landing Gear stickers to put on their BMX Innovation forks that are really just Landing Gear forks anyways. The Redline Flight Tubular 175 mm crankset is pretty awesome. Although I think the 9mm x 6-tooth heat-treated chromoly spindle and crank arms may be a lot stronger than the frame itself. Just keep in mind that after the frame and bottom bracket shell welds fail, you will be left with a very usable $119.00 crankset which you can put on another bike.

The ride. Not bad at all. When I say not bad, I mean for a single speed cruiser, it rides really not bad. The larger wheels make the ride smooth. The compact geometry of the Quadangle frame make it comfy. The stock Tange headset should be replaced by a Chris King No Threadset  or even a Neco to make the steering a little more confident. That’s about it.

Final note. The SE Racing Stu Thomsen Limited Edition 29-inch Quadangle is a cool bike. It’s a great bike for cruising and it’s looks are unique. Even if you are not a fan of the golden age of BMX racing, you would have a better chance of not looking like a tourist when riding along the beach on this thing. Buy it for the looks and ride. Don’t buy it if you are looking for a quality bike build.

Hey look! Pictures!

Quick Review: 2017 Specialized Ruby Expert

2017 Specialized Ruby Expert

2017 Specialized Ruby Expert

Be sure to check out the photo gallery at the end of the article!

It has been said by many that the existence of women’s specific frame geometries is hard to justify. Indeed, the rise of frames that are Rider-First Engineered™ with Women’s Endurance Geometry has been hard to ignore. Every major bicycle maker seems to have their own version of a female-inspired frame geometry. Although, as a not-so-typically shaped man, I struggle with finding my own perfect fit as well. However, a manufacturer creating a single geometry just for women is at odds with what I believe is the best way to fit a person to a bike.

I agree that there are many different body types out there and thus a need to offer more offerings to them. However, some of the implementations are a bit lacking. That said, it doesn’t mean that any woman rider who is looking for the perfect bike should automatically discard the idea of the Specialized Ruby Expert (or any other Ruby, Dolce, or Amira). I just believe that a woman (or a man, for that matter) should not feel like they are limited to a certain frame style just because of their gender.

Now that I have either bored you or set you up, here’s the review:

The Specialized Ruby Expert is the latest in the higher range of Specialized’s carbon endurance bikes. The Ruby is almost an exact mirror, level for level of the Roubaix, the flagship endurance road bike in the Specialized catalog. The main difference between the two models are the frame geometries and the colorways.

From across the room. To be honest, I thought this was an electric bike on first glance. That was due to the frame-mounted Road Kit that was situated near the bottom bracket. It looked like some sort of crankcase motor from far away. But upon inspection, it was just a simple toolkit. The Ruby Expert is the lowest model that comes stock with one of these out of the box. For every other bike, it is a $95.00 add on. The subdued colorway (Ruby Expert is only available in gray at this writing) makes it not-so-flashy. It’s a really neat color to have for a bike. One that doesn’t scream “feminine” or “beast woman” is a relief.

The ride. Very nice. Like I said. I am a not-so-typically shaped man, and the frame (54 cm tested) fit me quite well. The most noticeable thing was of course, the Future Shock™. What is future shock, you ask? Well here’s the engineers at Specialized speaking through their content marketing filters:

For many, “smoothness” is a term that’s replaceable with “comfort,” and likewise, it’s been historically treated as a variable that’s in the way of speed—you either have a fast bike or a comfortable bike. With the Future Shock, however, we set out to find just what happens when smoothness is treated as a component of speed. It was complicated, but our testing clearly proves that “smoother” is indeed “faster.”

There’s a lot more that they have to say about this. Click the link above to read the rest. It’s well crafted. In any case, I found the Future Shock to be much more than just a flip-flopped Head Shok. The difference between the two is that the where the Head Shok allowed the frame to change angles, the Future Shock does not. Also, Specialized uses the correct spelling of “shock” in the name. Seriously, though, the Future Shock only allows just the handlebars to change height. New and better updates to an old idea. And it actually is different! Mind. Blown. Future Shock is available on the Elite and above models. Lower-end models still use the Zertz fork and seat-stay inserts.

I took the opportunity to ride a demo of this machine to and from work one day. No, I was not worried about people shouting “you’re riding a girls’ bike!” Honestly, there’s no way to tell from across the street. I have a few climbs on the way to work and I found that the Future Shock did not cause any problems. At no time did I feel any of my power being transferred to the downward motion of the bars. The decoupled seat post combined with the Zertz insert did not reduce pothole (or cobblestone) shock as much as I thought it would. However, it does reduce it by more than the older models. The ride is still smoother than anything I would have expected from other bikes. The frame is stiff and light. The handling is really responsive. At the Expert level, this bike is more than enough for the non-pro enthusiast or seasoned bike club member.

The build. What can I say about Ultegra? What can I say about a bike that ships stock with a full Ultegra drive train? As a not-yet convert to Di2, this Ultegra set still makes the ride enjoyable and worry free. Shimano continues to make buttery-smooth shifting with their mechanical components. A welcome feature that raises the price of this bike a little, but it is definitely worth the extra cabbage.

Climbing and descending on rough roads, an endurance rider needs all the help she can get. Specialized lovingly decided to stop wheel motion with the Shimano 805 flat-mount hydraulic disc brake set. These are essential to the type of riding this bike is designed for. Combine those with the 50/34 compact double chainrings and this bike has all the potential to be a QOM/KOM monster.

Final note. Will this bike save you extra pain in the butt from potholes, ruts, etc.? No. Crappy roads are are pretty brutal and no bike save for a dual suspension mountain bike can take enough shock away. However, this bike, for cobblestones and crappy roads is super nice. It is a good build with awesome specs. Recommended buy for anyone looking to up their endurance game.

Surly Straggler: A Cyclocross Experiment

Surly Straggler 1x11 Ultegra to XTR via Tanpan.

Surly Straggler 1×11 Ultegra to XTR via Tanpan.

I spoke to Captain Obvious and he told me (confidentially) that cyclocross is kind of a big deal. I was loath to believe him as I usually don’t trust people with ridiculous names. But a quick look at sites like the Radavist convinced me. It’s everywhere!

Cyclocross has been around since the early 20th century. It was a niche category with niche bike builds (usually totally custom) and a little-understood reason for why anyone would want to ride a drop-bar bicycle in the mud. As it turns out, human beings, especially cyclist humans, are filthy creatures. They love getting all dirty and holding it up as a badge of honor. Remember that guy who drove his 4×4 to get groceries with his truck all covered in mud from the last time it rained? The same theory applies to cyclocross. It’s just plain rad, is what it is. There’s nothing like getting all tricked out in some amazing, colorful kit, then getting it all muddy. Entropy is awesome. As humans and cyclists, we’re damn good at it.

So in response to getting older and wanting to be more awesome, I decided to build a cyclocross bike…only build one that would get me more points in the rad department. Though not a pure cyclocross frame, the Surly Straggler seemed to fit the bill for my needs. I love steel and Surly makes some pretty nice frames with disc tabs. I decided to do a frame-up compete build from scratch, including lacing my own wheels. So strap in and get ready, I about to attempt to blow your mind…

After acquiring a mint-colored 54cm Surly Straggler frame from my shop, I set to work building the wheels. Since I wanted to get a nice colorway going, I thought lacing red anodized White Industries XMR 6-bolt disc hubs to WTB Frequency Team CX hoops would look pretty neat-o. DT Swiss 2.0/1.8 Revolution spokes? Don’t mind if I do.

Disc brakes are always fun, but I’m a bit of a scaredy-cat when it comes to hydraulic disc setups. I am still not comfy with the whole bleeding and olive and barb thing. Besides, cables are easy to maintain and can be fixed in the field. So I took a look at the new Paul Components Klampers and decided that the cool factor was too high for me to ignore. After much truing of the wheel and bolting on of the discs, I had a rolling frame.

Next was the drive train: I could have gone the traditional 2-by route and got myself a Ultegra or CX-specific setup. But I wanted to go deeper. I wanted the ability to climb, race, and haul heavy loads (like myself, for instance). I chose an Ultegra-to-XTR-via-Tanpan setup. Didn’t get all that? Well I wanted STI shifters, a single chainring, and the ability to run a 40-tooth cog. The only thing I could see that works well enough is the Wolftooth Components Tanpan cable pull adjuster. Now, with a Wolftooth 39-tooth narrow-wide chanring attached to my Ultegra crankset and connected to an 11-40 cassette lovingly cradled by an XTR 11-speed derailleur, I could get as rad as I want.

Combine all this with Salsa Cowbell 2 Handlebars,  Thompson stem and seat post, Chris King Headset, Brooks Cambium C15 saddle, Raceface Atlas pedals (until I get used to the ride), and S-Works Renegade 29 x 1.8 tires, I am now ready for some serious dirt assault. It’s entropy time!

Partial build list (costs MSRP or sale in US Dollars at the time of posting). Please order from and support your LBS (local bike shop) unless link provided below:

  • Surly Straggler 54 cm frame – approx. $500.
  • WTB XMR 6-bolt disc hubs – Front: $189, rear, $379.
  • WTB 32-hole Frequency i19 Team CX rims – $79.95 x 2.
  • Shimano Ultegra 6800 Crankset – $169.99 from Chain Reaction.
  • Shimano Ultegra 6800 2×11 shifters – $196.49 from Chain Reaction.
  • Shimano XT M8000 11-speed 11-40 tooth cassette – $59.95 from Chain Reaction.
  • Shimano ICE-Tech SM-RT86 6-bolt rotors (160 mm) – $32.00 x 2
  • Paul Components Klamper short pull disc brake calipers – $175.00 x 2
  • Wolftooth Components 39-tooth Chainring for 110 BCD 4-bolt Shimano cranks – $78.95. Get direct.
  • Wolftooth Components Tanpan inline pull adjuster – $39.95. Get direct.
  • Shimano XTR M9000 Shadow Plus Medium Cage rear derailleur – $149.99 from Chain Reaction.
  • Thomson Elite X4 70mm MTB stem (31.6 clamp) – $99.99
  • Thomson Elite 27.2 seat post – $99.95
  • Chris King Red Sotto Voce 1-1/8 Threadless Headset – $149.99
  • Brooks Cambium C15 saddle – $175.00
  • S-Works Renegade 29 x 1.8 tires – $59.95 x 2
  • Salsa Cowbell 2 handlebars – $50.00
  • Salsa Lip Lock seat post clamp (30.0 clamp) – $22.00
  • Raceface Atlas pedals – $150.00

Ride it!

Adventures in Wheelbuilding

IMG_5915

If there was a conversation going on near your cubicle where you overheard one person say, “just bring your bike to Tyson, he knows everything about bikes. He can totally fix it.” The person with said broken bike would be in for a surprise: I don’t know everything there is to know about bikes. I just like them a lot. Besides, being a bike nerd doesn’t require knowing how to repair everything on a bicycle.

The sad fact is, achieving bicycle perfection is a lot like achieving nirvana: even though you know that you’ll never get there, you must keep trying. Therein lies the motivation. There are still many things that escape my knowledge of bicycle repair: hydraulic disk brake bleeding is one, rebuilding suspension is another. Those have always felt a little too car-like for me, and thus I have tended to shy away from them. I will eventually get around to them one day as I did with wheel building.

Over the years, I have managed to accumulate quite a few extra bike parts. Among the detritus in my closet (I live in a studio apartment) were two old hubs. I acquired the old Shimano Parallax 110 (XT) front and DT Swiss Onyx 8/9/10 rear in a trade that I vaguely remember. They sat there, buried under the strata of my “collection” for years. That is, until another trade netted me a pair of NOS Araya CV-7 26-inch rims (single wall, but still nice). I was sure that I did not have a project that needed 26-inch wheels. I had just finished the pre-build of an old Bridgestone which had its own wheels already. So why would I even consider accepting some more rims?

The answer came to me, when, out of curiosity, I dug out the two hubs from under years of brake levers, cassettes, and spare tubes. I was actually wondering how many spoke holes these hubs had as I knew the Arayas were sporting 32 each.

I was in luck. Both the Parallax (new in box) and the Onyx (take-off) were 32-hole refugees from some distant past. I’ll bet you’re expecting me to describe how I would hold the take-off part in my hand, and in closed-eyed wonder, imagine all the miles traveled on the bike it used to be a part of. No. Hell no. Save that noise for art-gallery hipsters who’ve plenty of time between tattoos and artisnal wooden handlebar purchases. I need to learn how to build a damn bicycle wheel.

<goodoldays> When I was young, if there was something I wanted to learn about bicycle repair, I had to bother some grumpy old bicycle mechanic or buy a book. The interwebs and Google machines hadn’t been invented yet. So I have to say, this is a wonderful time to be alive. </goodoldays>.

I ordered some spokes and nipples, borrowed a friends truing stand and fired up a YouTube video on how to lace wheels. So how did I know which spokes and nipples to order, you ask? Well, since my hubs and rims were on the older side, I needed to find a good caliper and measure some stuff. The best site I found that explains this is Edd. They have easy-to-follow diagrams and a video about how to measure everything (spokes, nipples and rims) to get you the right spoke length. They also have a database of hubs and rims already in there in case you have a more modern set of wheel parts. DT Swiss is another great site to find a good spoke calculator as well (registration required).

As you may have seen in the picture above, I did make it all the way to lacing the wheel. It’s actually quite relaxing. I just kicked back on the couch, watched a little Parks and Recreation whilst lacing, consuming a beer in the process. The lacing is quite easy to understand. Given the pattern and where you start on the rim. It all just sort of falls into place. For me, the most difficult part is the tensioning and truing. By the great Beard of Zeus, I could not find a decent video tutorial on how to tackle this part. It’s probably  the Google machine knowing I am a not-young fart and I don’t deserve to get my tutorials easily.

Stormtrooper: Surly Long Haul Trucker

Surly Long Haul Trucker Retro MTB

Surly Long Haul Trucker Retro MTB

(See gallery below for more images!)

I have what some would say would be an unhealthy obsession with steel-framed bikes. The fact that pedaling a heavier bike makes you exercise harder leaves that point moot. Recently, nostalgia got the best of me. I decided that I wanted to convert my Surly Long Haul Trucker to an all-around short-distance commuter and trail bike. The Surly Long Haul Trucker is one of those steel-framed bikes known for its strength and versatility. Indeed, anyone who buys one can take advantage of a good all-around geometry and the ability to customize the bike for almost any need. The Long Haul, or LHT, comes in two wheel sizes 26″ and 700c (in 56cm frames and above). I decided to take a look at the bike and see what I could create.

Being a rather untall fellow with shortish legs, I my Surly is 52cm frame (only available in 26″ wheels). I figured, for versatility’s sake, that this bike in 26″ would allow me the best range of customization. I could make a world tourer, a single speed commuter or a rigid trail bike. Having grown up in the 80s in Southern California, a rigid trail bike was what everyone had if they didn’t have a road bike or a beach cruiser. I can’t stand riding a beach cruiser, and since I have a Surly road-ish bike already, I opted to build myself a retro-inspired mountain bike á la 1982 Specialized.

A fiend of mine was sporting the above-mentioned Specialized with these nifty bullmoose handle bars by Nitto. I knew that Rivendell sold them but only in a threaded headset version. Since the Stormtrooper (as opposed to Stumpjumper…that’s what I am calling the LHT these days) had a threadless headset, I was at a loss. Thanks to the all-powerful Google Machine, I happened upon Fairweather which had a Surly LHT pictured with some threadless Nitto bullmoose bars! Being only around $80.00 US, I ordered the bars immediately. The next step was to re-route the shifting and braking.

Anyone who wants to get a lot of really nice aluminum components milled right here in the good ol’ USA, look no further than Paul Components. These guys make some of the nicest parts out there. Their braking components are second to none. I have their cantis on two other bikes and plan to put them on this bike as well. What I was really after was the thumbies. I took the Dura Ace bar end shifters and adapted them for use on the straight bullmoose bar and violá! Old Skool Stormtrooper in effect!

One of Surly’s most famous decals says “Fatties Fit Fine” and you will find it on the chainstays of most of their bikes. Indeed, the specs for the max tire width on the LHT according to Surly is 2.1″, although I think that a 2.25″ could be wedged in there as long as it has smaller knobs. I opted for the classic gumwalled Duro tires in 26 x 2.1. They hearken back to a time when there were only a few types of MTB tire available, and it was not uncommon to see a dude flying down the street with giant-knobbed tires buzzing like a 4×4. So these fit the bill. It already comes with a Shimano LX triple drivetrain which I left stock because retroness.

So I’m all set. I will keep you updated on the progress. I plan to install some Paul brakes and cable hangers and new pedals (undecided). Rundown of parts and costs after the gallery.

Build list:

  • Bike: 2014 Surly Long Haul Trucker – Smog Silver MSRP $1,350.00
  • Handlebars: Nitto B903 Threadless Bullmoose bars. $78.00 (buy here)
  • Brake Levers: Paul Components Canti Levers. $128.00/pair (buy here)
  • Shifting: Paul Components Thumbies. $74.00/pair (buy here)*
  • Tires: Duro Gumwall MTB, can be found on eBay for about $19.99 per tire.

*Does not include bar-end shiters. Use the stock Dura Ace that come with the LHT.

 

In Defense of Rim Brakes

Paul Neo Retro Touring Canti

Paul Neo Retro Touring Canti

It was a long struggle with pneumonia. It was close…real close. I am still not back on the bike but I am getting there. While I recover, I wanted to talk about brakes.

Probably the most invasive technology in the cycling world (aside from crabon everything) is disc brakes. They are becoming more common on bikes these days and it seems you can’t event spend as low as $770.00 on a bike without getting some hydraulic discs in the package. Indeed, where just a couple of years ago, hydraulic disc brakes were the sole property of bikes costing over $1,500.00. Nay, mountain bikes costing over $1500.00. Now they are everywhere. And for good reason: they stop a bike more efficiently, function on warped rims and are great in wet weather. Hydraulics do not suffer a much from that annoying zing-zing sound that mechanical disc brakes are so fond of making. Once the exclusive domain of mountain bikers, they are sneaking onto every other type of bike being offered for sale to consumers. The drawback to these things? There are two that I can think of: weight and maintenance.

Weight is a minor issue on entry-level bikes. Most riders who are out getting exercise and enjoying the fresh air are not looking to shave grams, They are looking for a solid bike for the lowest price. The trouble with putting hydro discs on an entry-level hybrid is evident immediately to the entry-level rider purchasing said bike: the maintenance. If I were to mention reservoirs, brake fluid and bleeding to this type of bicycle consumer, they would imagine a greasy-faced auto mechanic in coveralls holding up a master cylinder in front of their face saying: “Now there’s your problem!” But the truth is, today’s hydro brakes can be maintained with just a little practice or for a modest fee at you LBS. Even a brake-bleeding kit only costs $25.00.

So are rim brakes obsolete? Some may say so, especially the members of the weak-minded spandex army of Freds because they are easily moved by marketing. However, the other drawback that I mentioned before, weight, can have a serious effect on a sub-16-pound road bike. There are some companies, like Giant for instance, that have appropriated side-pull brakes for their road bikes. I think this is an interesting concept. Take the 2015 Giant Propel Advanced SL 0. This is their highest-end road bike and it retails for a whopping $10,800.00! And it has side-pull rim brakes. Granted, they are getting pretty aero with these, mounting them behind the forks, so there’s a good way to subtract some milliseconds to your stage time. The weight is pretty light, too. Just when you thought manufacturers were going disc crazy, here comes Giant with the weakest style of rim brakes on their most expensive consumer road bike. It is truly mind bottling…you know, when things get so crazy it gets your thoughts all trapped like in a bottle? But hey, these brakes are super easy to maintain and they are super light as well. That should be very pleasing to the Freds out there.

To be honest, I am rather fond of a good set of cantilever brakes. Sure they may be a pain to adjust, but they are the best at stopping power aside from some of the higher-end calipers out there. Plus they make my bikes look all steam-punky. That’s always a plus with the ladies. End of line.

Erin

Erin and her Bridgestone Mixte

Erin and her Bridgestone Mixte

Sometimes it rains in Santa Barbara. Years ago, it used to rain a lot. Years before that, it didn’t. But the drought pattern ebbs and flows like waves. Currently, we are in the worst and driest spot since the 80s. Santa Barbarians are made of some pretty soft stuff. Indeed, as I sit here in the coffee shop I am overhearing some roadies complain that it is currently 48 degrees F outside. However, when water does actually fall from the sky, most of us would look up and say something like: “well that’s weird…”

In any case, it was a little unusual to see the rain. Even more unusual, there were a lot of people on two wheels out riding in it looking like they were enjoying themselves. As was the case, Erin came into get a flat fixed. She was sporting a Bridgestone Kabuki single-bar mixte with an awesome basket made from a Maine lobster trap.

The bike was in great condition for its age. It is probably of late 70s or early 80s vintage. The frame was of the lugged Japanese cro-mo variety and seemed better built than comparable bikes of its age.

I would like to know more about this bike. If anyone has more information on it, please leave a comment and I will update the post as information comes in.

Quick Review: 2015 Kona Hei Hei Deluxe

TJ and the 2015 Kona Hei Hei Deluxe

TJ and the 2015 Kona Hei Hei Deluxe

Ah Kona. Kona Kona Kona. Always surprising me with something I didn’t expect. I mean, after last year’s lineup, I thought that the maker of the overbuilt-yet-surprisingly-finessable Process line of compact all-mountain shredders would never be able to top themselves. After all, we have been waiting for a crabon Process to emerge in 2015 only to find that we will have to keep waiting. But never fear: Kona has, for some reason, been able to produce an XC Race in crabon for those who feel they need to go really fast on not-so-paved surfaces.

Coming away a little nonplussed after the whole Hei Hei Hei thing last year, Kona has finally unscrewed their naming convention and has returned this year with a race bike that is, for lack of a better word, spongeworthy. The 2015 Hei Hei Deluxe seems to be the end result of a lot of trial and error that has finally produced a winning design.

With Kona being able to produce some of the most killer aluminum bikes for those non-weight weenies who just like to go out and shred, their crabon lineup is surpisingly competitive. The Hei Hei Dee’s frame is extremely strong and stiff. Made from Kona’s awesome Race Light crabon, the bike, as large as it is, is extremely responsive. The whole entire bike weighs in at a svelt 28 pounds and change: awesome for a dual-suspension 29er. The look of the frame, for those who care, is sleek, without that extra futuristic bullshit that makes most crabon bikes look like Logans Run rejects which are destined to be put out of their stylistic misery after they get too old.

Suspension? Naginata please. Anyone who wants to complain about a 100mm travel 29er with Beamer suspension maybe shouldn’t be buying this bike (#firstworldproblems). Combined with the 120mm Fox Float 32 CTD Evolution front fork, this combination is sure to produce a sufficiently sphincter-puckering response whilst screaming across all Creation, birds, snakes and bears diving out of your way. The combination is perfect. So shut up.

So what else will the snobs complain about that I can just refute right now because this bike is so awesome? Ah yes, the Shimano SLX group with XT rear derailleur component build. Well, look people: this is not the Hei Hei Supreme. If you are a Fred (or Frieda) that fancies him/herself a pro rider, then fine, by all means complain. But this is the mid-range bike, folks. And besides, SLX these days is extremely reliable and smooth. This build is not only affordable, it is right up there with the XTR and SRAM X0 stuff that is out this year.

The wheels are perfect for this build level. Not for the pro but for the average racer, Stan’s ZTRs are a great set of hoops. I would probably go with a tire upgrade, though as I have never been a Maxxis Ikon fan. But hey, snobbery aside, the wheel package for this level is just fine. Grind the tires down and upgrade when ready.

To sum up. The response of this bike is amazing. It is light, fast and has all the features that anyone getting into XC Racing would want. As I always like to say, it is a very affordable race platform that will easily last several seasons. After you beat the shit out of the SLX group and the Fox Float forks, upgrading is always a good idea. I am not sure, what with the styling and frame materials, that getting another bike after a couple of seasons would be necessary. Just add your own parts later and make it your own. Just don’t go upgrade-crazy right out of the gate. Kona has definitely produced a great build that is sure to see some trophies this year.

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Overreaction to Winter: a Birthright of the Santa Barbarian

studded tires

Studded tires outside the Presidio in Santa Barbara. Sign of subtropical Winter.

Back when I was in college, I met a girl from Oregon. She grew up outside of Eugene and moved down here to go to college. Her first impression of Santa Barbara was what giant pussies we all are when it comes to the weather. She was surprised, for example, that when the temperature dipped below 60 degrees Farenheit, Santa Barbarians would don huge jackets, top boots and scarves. Cyclists around here tend to wear multiple layers of lycra kit on top of arm warmers, knee warmers and the occasional balaclava if they can see their breath.

I guess people from outside Southern California (yes, Santa Barbara is in Southern California) are made of stronger stuff than we are. For example, when it rains, cycling for the most part stops. You might see the occasional Rufus out on his K-mart special going to wherever, but all the serious cyclists tend to hide. I mean, it’s just water, right? How do they take a shower if they are so afraid of water?

I guess it’s all relative. Our perspective is skewed. That girl from Oregon? She kept complaining that it was always too hot. And me? I just spotted a bike outside with studded tires. It doesn’t even snow here. The overreactions are astonishing.

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