Quick Review: 2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle

2017 SE Racing Stu Thompson Edition 29" Quadangle

2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle – Wait! Where’s my Landing Gears???

Picture Gallery at the end of the article!

BMX racing back in the 1970s and 80s was something special. It was a new sport. For children and adolescents, it gave them the ability to race bicycles in serious, organized competition. Not only that, they had their own heroes to look up to that weren’t European. Racers such as Perry Kramer and Stu Thomsen, to name only two, were right up there as the bicycle versions of motocross champions. It is no wonder that SE Racing, which has been making BMX racing bikes since the 1970s (they are celebrating their 40th year this year), has seized upon the champions of that time to reintroduce us to the storied bicycles of our past.

That’s why I was so excited when I heard that SE Racing was planning to release the Stu Thomsen Edition Quadangle, the STR-29. Their previous version of the 26-inch Quadangle was so well received by the BMX nostalgia set, that I was waiting to see what they would come up with next. A new colorway? Maybe some shiny pads? I was hoping that there would be something else other than the Public Enemy Big Ripper to make their bikes more exciting.

Before I get to the review, let’s talk about beach cruisers for a second. The SE Racing Retro series are not meant to be raced anymore. They are pure nostalgia pieces that make excellent cruisers. Beach cruisers, at least the modern interpretation, are not even bicycles. They are a decision made by some corporate monkeys who want to keep their companies relevant somehow. So I can see the reason for the SE Racing Retro series existence. They hearken back to the days when one wasn’t racing, they were cruising. They also look way cooler and are of a higher quality (relatively speaking) than their flowery, wicker-basketed counterparts. Bikes like the Quadangle are not here to replace what beach cruisers have become. They are here to give people an opportunity to look good on a bike whilst cruising. SE Racing has done a great job of tapping into nostalgia and creating that necessary out for those who just want to pedal down to the beach and not look like an asshole.

See these girls? No way I'm getting any by riding this bike.

See these girls? Ten-speed dude in the back has a better chance with them.

Enough said about my opinion about beach cruisers. So now lets get to the review.

From across the room. Just like the 26-inch Quadangle…’cept different. How different? Well let me just say that this bike would look normal sized next to The Mountain, or the Statue of Liberty. It’s 29-inch wheels are big, to be sure. But in my opinion, they look a little too big compared to the compact-looking Quadangle geometry. But hey, we’re all compensating for something, amirite? Hey, check out the quote on the bike’s product page and get schooled in some old-school retroness:

Before the Quadangle, there was the STR-1. This dates back to the late 1970’s when Stu Thomsen was SE Racing’s National #1 pro and the sport’s first superstar. His signature frame at the time was the Stu Thomsen Replica-1. This STR-1 frame had a unique design with both of the double down tubes wrapping underneath the bottom bracket shell and continuing around the Looptail rear end all the way back to the seat tube. Less than ten STR-1’s were ever produced, and over the years these frames became almost mythical and the most sought after frames of all time in the vintage BMX world. Fast forward nearly 40 years to today and SE is proud to bring you, the limited edition STR-29. All of the unique features and radness of the original STR-1, but built for the bigger rider with 29″ wheels. This bike comes with an authentic SE Racing x Stu Thomsen trading card personally signed by Stu. Making history, once again.

The bigger rider? Well, I guess that some of us who remember Stu’s glory days are a little on the heavy side now. Just remember that this is a tribute bike, not an exact replica. It does not look anything like the original. So they had to make some adjustments so this bike would look normal when ridden by grown-ass men. In any case, I asked Stu what he thought at Interbike back in September and he seemed cool with it. So there you go. Validation.

Stu and his normal-sized Quadangle back in 1980.

Stu and his normal-sized Quadangle back in 1980.

The build. After all this historical context, I just can’t…I can’t be nice about this. There really is no other way to put it: The build quality is lacking in…well, quality. Particularly, the welding. I want to focus on this as there are so many of us in the bike world that look at welding as the one facet that speaks to a bike’s build quality. For the STR Quadangle, it looks like whoever (or whatever machine) initially tacked the frame together forgot to finish the job. One would think, after reading the above quote, that the bottom bracket shell would have had some semblance of quality control attention paid to it. But it looks like it is ready to just snap off. The other Quadangles that SE has put out didn’t have this problem. The BB shells were welded to the frame in a more acceptable fashion. Having never seen an original STR-1 up close, I can’t say for certain that the welding is period correct or not. I’m only looking at this bike from a modern quality and safety viewpoint.

The usual SE Racing components are there: the fluted seat post, the blocky stem and the saddle that they seem to phone in on every model. The tires, freewheel and pedals are what you’d expect from a bike of this price point. You even get a limited edition sticker pack and BMX trading card signed by Stu himself.

A welcome sight is to see the lack of a Landing Gear sticker on the forks. “BMX Innovations” is period correct and sounds way better. However, I can just see Landing Gear fans buying Landing Gear stickers to put on their BMX Innovation forks that are really just Landing Gear forks anyways. The Redline Flight Tubular 175 mm crankset is pretty awesome. Although I think the 9mm x 6-tooth heat-treated chromoly spindle and crank arms may be a lot stronger than the frame itself. Just keep in mind that after the frame and bottom bracket shell welds fail, you will be left with a very usable $119.00 crankset which you can put on another bike.

The ride. Not bad at all. When I say not bad, I mean for a single speed cruiser, it rides really not bad. The larger wheels make the ride smooth. The compact geometry of the Quadangle frame make it comfy. The stock Tange headset should be replaced by a Chris King No Threadset  or even a Neco to make the steering a little more confident. That’s about it.

Final note. The SE Racing Stu Thomsen Limited Edition 29-inch Quadangle is a cool bike. It’s a great bike for cruising and it’s looks are unique. Even if you are not a fan of the golden age of BMX racing, you would have a better chance of not looking like a tourist when riding along the beach on this thing. Buy it for the looks and ride. Don’t buy it if you are looking for a quality bike build.

Hey look! Pictures!

2 thoughts on “Quick Review: 2017 SE Racing STR-29 Quadangle

  1. What are the other options though, love to knownwhat else is out there or are the other 29 se models just a better build that will hold up to a seriouse workout….cheers sean

    • I think the best build you can get in a 29er from SE is the Big Ripper. It has gussets and larger tubing. The bottom bracket is solidly in place. For another option there is the Kona Humu Humu.

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